My Short Stories

FRIENDS, FAMILY AND OTHER STRANGERS FROM DOWNUNDER



Fourteen humorous, shocking, heart-wrenching tales about Australian people for readers everywhere. Features several award-winning stories.

Available as an e-Book from all Amazon stores.

    

Listen to Santa Never Made It - on a podcast

"Liza Perrat has compiled fourteen stories covering the full range of emotions and experiences. The depth of characterisation, superb dialogue and scene setting which puts the reader right into the story makes this collection storytelling at its absolute best. I cannot recommend it highly enough."
Lorraine Mace – writer, columnist and author.



REVIEWS...


's review
Feb 17, 14

bookshelves: 2012-release, aussie-authors, short-stories, eclectic-reader-challenge-2014, owned-unread, read-on-kindle
Read on February 17, 2014 — I own a copy

From the very first, Rose Coloured Minute sets the pace – we go along for the ride with Marianne as she spends the most excruciating minute of her life, waiting for the lines on the test to give her the answer she so desperately wants…

Window without Glass tells of Cerisa from Australia who is backpacking around Turkey. After getting lost she comes across Leyla who has never ventured from her village…

Visiting Rites is touching and sad, deep and meaningful.

While Corner of Acacia and Beach Streets really touched a chord with me. Forever stuck in that time, waiting for Paul to pick her up from the corner of Acacia and Beach Streets; telling Tabitha about the past…

Santa Never Made It tells of Darwin, Christmas 1974 - Wendy, surly and fed up; her little brother Jamie who is adopted; their Mum and Dad - what happened that Christmas Day to change them all, especially Wendy?

This anthology of fourteen short stories by Aussie author Liza Perrat is an enjoyable mixture for everyone and I have no hesitation in recommending Friends, Family and Other Strangers From Downunder to all.

 
***


's review
Nov 18, 13

bookshelves: indie, aww-2013
Read from November 17 to 18, 2013

A wonderfully eclectic collection of distinctly Australian short stories, each with its own message. The stories are evocative and invoke all the senses.

The heartbreaking tale of Visiting Rites is especially powerful and tugs at the deepest parts of the psyche.

***



's review
Aug 19, 12

Read in May, 2012

This is a lovely collection of insights into Australia, but be warned, you'll be Googling flights when you put it down. The author captures the atmosphere of a young, vast country, with unpredictable weather and huge spaces. The stories are varied; some touching, some thoughtful and some leave you wondering about how we really see one another. The range of perspectives make this collection so special, along with the individual voices recording moments of change. I think my favourite has to be Santa Never Made It. A beautiful piece, in a distinctive tone, about how love can be a sneaky sort of thing. 
***

Format:Kindle Edition
In stories like Santa Never Came, and Daughter of Atlas, Perrat explores the layers and complexities of an immigrant nation, of different cultures coming together under a baking sun and learning to adapt to one another. Using beautiful language, she holds a lens up to small, telling details - of food, of flowers, of changing weather. Her narrators are often teenagers, caught between childhood and adulthood, between old cultures and new, trying to make sense of both. This is assuredly not the Australia of Crocodile Dundee, but a much more nuanced country, one the rest of the world deserves to know better. 
***

4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting mix if short stories from Down Under. July 24, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Liza Perrat has shown her talent with words and creating atmosphere yet again. Each story holds the reader's interest until the final moment, and each story is so different and takes the reader on a journey and to a place in an atmosphere of tension. The young girl whose Christmas was turned upside down in such an unexpected way, and the career woman's life-changing experience in such a tiny fragment of time. Keep the stories coming Mme Perrat.
***
4.0 out of 5 stars Page turner, July 24, 2012
This review is from: Friends, Family and Other Strangers From Downunder (Kindle Edition)
This book of short stories wasn't what I first expected when I read it was about life in Australia. Sunshine, suncream and barbecues this is not! But it's a really interesting and eclectic mix of stories, each with an added layer of darkness that keeps you turning the pages. The descriptions are really vivid, and I can imagine Australians relating to this glimpse of the other side of the Aussie image - the steelworks at Woollongong are as well depicted as a central part of Tanya's life in my favourite story, Hosing Venetian Blinds, as are the sun, sea and endless blue skies. The language is great and there are some wonderfully strong characters in these stories. I could really hear the dialect and picked up some great images of Aussie life. There is some super writing here and it's clear the author has a lot of stories to tell about her experiences in Australia. I look forward to Volume 2!
***

4.0 out of 5 stars Delightful, eclectic mix of short stories, July 24, 2012
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Friends, Family and Other Strangers From Downunder (Kindle Edition)
This is a delightful mix of short stories portraying the Australian humour, darkness and distinctive character in an intelligent and creative style, immediately capturing the readers interest. A great read for Australians and foreigners/travellers alike. Would highly recommend it to any avid reader.
 ***
5.0 out of 5 stars Friends, Family and other strangers from down under, March 18, 2012
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Friends, Family and Other Strangers From Downunder (Kindle Edition)
These short stories by Liza Perrat are wonderful as they are short and 'snappy' as you cannot stop reading them until you reach the climax. That is, they are great page turners. The tension builds up and you are holding your breath imagining the ending. Sometimes the ending is a big surprise and you feel a sense of relief whilst other endings are a shock and it is like someone has hit you. Being Australian, I can identify so many of the scenarios as Liza has captured the Australian culture and vernacular. I particularly liked Poor Cecilia, Santa Never Made It and Rose Coloured Minute which were so tense. In Santa, I felt that I was experiencing what it is like to be caught in a terrifying cyclone, the heat, the noise, the fear and the aftermath of destruction. Liza Perrat has a great style of setting the scene so one feels like that they are in it.
***